Essential Food Storage - For Emergencies and Every Day Living

basic food storage list - long term storage plan - short term storage list #1- list #2 - List #3 - recipes - water

 

BE PREPARED AND FEAR NOT!

As with those at the time of Joseph of Egypt
ONLY THOSE WITH ACCESS TO FOOD STORAGE WILL SURVIVE

Producing and storing food and water may be as essential to our temporal welfare today as
boarding the Ark was to the people in the days of Noah!

HEALTH is our goal. Anyone can store canned goods. Store foods that will build your immune system, give you energy and keep you healthy! The items we suggest, to store, are not only the most inexpensive and easiest foods to store, but also the BEST foods you can store.

When you eat junk foods, good food has no appeal. As you introduce real food into your diet, your taste buds change. You will find you crave sweets less, and good food more.

Recipes are found in the Amazing Wheat Book by LeArta Moulton, who has been perfecting whole food cooking, over the past 30 years, to make them easy and fast to prepare, with tastes the whole family will love.



TESTIMONIALS
from those who have used her books and videos in preparing whole foods

"The Amazing Wheat Book was my first experience in vegetarian recipes. Now after 3 years
of eating healthier and saving at least $10,000 on my grocery bill, I am singing its praises to
everyone I see!" -Debbie Hadden

"My kids advertise and brag about how good the Wheat Meat meals are! They love everything
we try from your Amazing Wheat Book. It was named appropriately!" - Suzanne Harris

"We appreciate the simplicity and style in your Amazing Wheat Book. Using Food Storage,
( like our many buckets of the wheat, powdered milk, honey etc.) has stumped us for years".
- Susan Powell

"We applaud your work and greatly appreciate the time and effort and helping other to benefit
from your creative recipes". - Leanne Geertson Adamson

"You are an answer to our prayers, and you will be blessed for all you've done Your fast, easy
techniques for preparing whole grains and the use of herbs have opened up a whole new world
for us". - Lori Egbert

Copyright© 2001 Nature's Medicine Chest

5 FOODS THAT SUSTAIN LIFE
Inexpensive and Life Giving

The availability and storage life of these 5 foods are excellent.
The versatility by which they can be modified, and combined to give
variety and palatable food preparations seems never ending
.

 Basic Whole Food Items to Store

1. WATER - is more essential than food in sustaining life. Minimum amount is 1 gal. per
day per person. Store a minimum of a 2 weeks supply, which would be 14 gallons. (7 gal. for
drinking and food preparation, and an addition 7 gal. per person of the same quality water for
bathing, brushing teeth, and dishwashing). If water from the tap is used and it is chlorinated,
it is not necessary to include Clorox for storing. Use heavy plastic containers with tight fitting
lids. Water purification drops would also be important to have.

2. GRAINS/SEEDS - grains include wheat, rice, rolled oats, dried corn, pearled barley
and other cereal grains. Store various grain items that suit your individual circumstances.
Flour, cornmeal, and pasta products such as macaroni and spaghetti could also be included.
Most grains can be stored in tightly sealed metal or heavy plastic containers. It would be
wise to store 325 lbs. of a variety of the above. We suggest you store about 60 pounds of
seeds. These can be used in the form of sprouting or planting. Only 1 ½ cups of a sprouted
seed per day can sustain life very adequately, for as long as you like.

3. HONEY (or substitute) - purchase raw, unfiltered honey when possible. Honey which
has had water added to it (to keep it more liquid and easier to pour) should not be used for
babies, as it can contain a bacteria that could be unsafe. Whole honey, is safe for everyone
and will last longer in storage, although it may crystallize and/or darken. Neither affects the
safety of the product. Store in small containers. Then, if it crystallizes, you can immerse the
containers in hot (not boiling) water to reliquify it. Store at least 60 lbs. It has been used for
centuries for many medicinal uses.

4. SALT - use a pure, not iodized, product. REAL salt or, a proven safe, sea salt is best.
It can be stored in its original container in a cool, dry place. Store other basic seasoning
mixes for a variety, (such as chili powder, spaghetti, taco mixes etc. making your own will
save a great deal of money and eliminate harmful preservatives and chemicals used in most
mixes)

5. OIL - fat is essential to every diet. Olive oil is by far the ultimate oil! It is nutritious, healing
and has the longest shelf life. Use only 100% virgin oil, not light. Cold pressed is the best but
costs more.

2 other Important Storage Foods:

LEGUMES - an inexpensive, nutritious protein food. This could include a variety of beans,
peas, lentils. They can be stored in clean, dry metal or plastic containers with tight fitting lids.

POWDERED MILK - although this pasteurized product is not a source of calcium, as the
dairy producers would like you to believe, and because many are allergic to it and other dairy
products, this is not a priority on our list; however, we will give you information on it and different
ways to prepare, in case it is already in your storage. Use sparingly. You will need the non-
instant dry milk powder to use for making candies, cheeses, etc. If you have stored the instant,
it can be reduced to non instant by blending, it in the blender, to a powder form.

In the quantity chart below, the pounds indicated are per person, per year.
A child, up to age 6, is about half the amount suggested for an adult

 BASIC LONG TERM FOOD STORAGE PLAN FOR ONE YEAR
Primary Priority

FOOD
STORAGE
 ITEMS

Quantity in Ibs. Required for each family member

Total amount needed
for family (goal)

Adults

Children

Teenagers

Male

Fem.

1-3 yrs.

4-6 yrs.

7-9
 yrs.

10-12 yrs.

13-15 yrs.

16-20 yrs.

Girl

Boy

Girl

Boy

Water (gallons)

1gal. per person per day (2 week min. supply)

14

14

14

14

 

Combined Grains

300

200

70

100

160

210

220

280

200

335

 

Sprouting Seeds

60

60

30

30

30

40

50

60

50

60

 

Legumes

35

30

15

20

30

35

35

45

35

55

 

Honey

30

20

15

20

25

30

30

40

30

50

 

Salt

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

 

Non Instant
dried milk

55

45

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

 

Oils, Fats,

30

25

25

20

20

30

30

40

20

45

 

Vitamin
Supplement

Be sure your choice has live enzymes included
(use according to directions)

Protein Source

Acquire info on how to combine the above foods for complete protein

Soul Foods

Foods that give a psychological lift; nuts, candy, dried foods, peanut butter, etc.

* Be sure to set goals for first aid, paper products, personal hygiene items, and spices.

Additional Items You May Want to Have on Hand:
A vitamin, mineral supplement
Vegetables and fruits (canned, bottled, dehydrated, frozen)
Yeast or yeast starters, and baking supplies
First aid (medicines, natural when possible)
Fuel (for cooking and heating, lanterns etc.)
Cooking equipment (stoves, pans, grinders, etc.)
Sanitary supplies (toilet paper and personals)
Personal care (dental necessities, shampoo, hair spray etc.)
Laundry Soap (including Clorox bleach, vinegar, natural cleaners)
Bedding (sleeping bags, blankets etc.)
Scriptures and legal documents, birth certificates, etc. (waterproofed)
72 hour kit
Money (include $20, bills and coins in your 72 hr. kit and a months salary in a save place).
A battery operated radio and extra, fresh batteries (essential if the power is out for a long period of time).

 Printable Version - Click>>
Basic Short Term Food Storage


IF YOU CANNOT STORE ALL OF THE ABOVE
Try the following SHORT TERM food lists

  LIST #1

If you could only store two foods,
these would be the most important!

WATER
SEEDS (organic, non-treated, used for sprouting)

Tools for sprouting (any of the following):
1. A quart jar, piece of nylon or wire mesh
2. Wash cloth, plate, cake pan
3. Commercial sprouting trays

(see instructions below)


Instructions for preparing items in List #1

WATER
Water is more essential than food in sustaining life, and over the long term needs to be constantly available from an unpolluted source. But realistically, in case of severe emergency, plan to have enough water to sustain your family for TWO WEEKS.

How Much to Store:
Water storage should take top priority in emergency preparedness. 1 gallon per day per person is the recommended minimum. 1/2 gallon (2 quarts) for daily drinking and ½ gallon for daily washing. Try going without the water from your faucets one day and see how you fare with your emergency water supply. You may decide, like we did, to dejunk more storage areas and make room for more water!
Store a minimum of 7 gallons of water per person for drinking and food preparation. Store an additional seven gallons per person of the same quality water for bathing, brushing teeth, and dishwashing. This is approximately 3 gallons per person for 72 hours, or 14 gallons for 2 weeks.

How to Store:
Water can be stored in any durable non-glass container designed to store liquids for extended periods. If you use plastic, plan on changing the water every few months, as there is some transfer of toxic materials from some plastics to the water. Empty plastic milk jugs are food-grade, but they may start leaking over a period of time. Empty and cleaned 2-liter pop bottles hold up just fine with indoor storage where the temperature is more constant; however, a 2-liter bottle that has been in the car-trunk during the heat of the summer and extreme cold of winter will eventually start to crack. Put a new 2-liter bottle of water in your car trunk at the change of extreme hot and extreme cold weather.

In summary, use heavy plastic containers with tight fitting lids. Metal containers, which may corrode, tend to give water an unpleasant taste. If possible, use non-breakable containers for your water storage. You could end up without a water supply if all your glass containers are shattered.

For information on Water Treatment click here>>

SEEDS for sprouting

WHY SPROUT?
One of the very best foods you can eat is sprouts. Sprouts are live plant foods that are biogenic
("life-generating), which means they transfer their vital life energy to you! They are packed with
enzymes which aid in digestion and are alkaline-forming. Sprouts can be grown in your kitchen
(from beans, lentils, grains, seeds, almonds) in any season, providing you with fresh organic
produce when no other garden is available. They are easy to grow, some in as little as one day.
Seeds for sprouting can be stored for long periods of time and can produce many times their
weight in fresh produce full of vitamins, minerals, and complete proteins.


Note: 1 ½ cups a day of mixed sprouts, and alfalfa that has had a chance to green up
a little, will supply you with complete nutrition and SUSTAIN LIFE!
A good mix for this would be equal parts of Alaska pea (better tasting than the garden pea),
lentils, mung bean, adjuki bean. Half as much of sunflower, fenugreek seed and triticale wheat.
An excellent combination to put with the alfalfa is red clover, cabbage, and radish.
You can purchase the combination of seeds mentioned above already mixed for your
convenience. Contact Life Sprouts 1-800-241-1516. They are organic and guaranteed to sprout.

They can be eaten alone, in salads, with grains, in sandwiches, gently steamed with veggies,
as a snack, or sprinkled over soup. Everyone should store organic sprouting seeds and use
sprouts in their daily diet. This is the best way to eat soy. It is the ideal way to eat all legumes.
When sprouted, they are much easier to digest and will not produce intestinal gas as they do
when cooked.

During an emergency you will have a number of basic needs such as alternate methods of
cooking; some method of preserving perishable food; and a supply of foods that require little
or no preparation or refrigeration. In time of emergency, your source of heat may not be
available and you will be forced to search for an alternate method of heating or using your food.

Sprouts can sustain you! Don't want to wait until an emergency hits. Start now to introduce
sprouts into your diet. It may be a food you need to get use to, but as you do you will learn
to really enjoy the taste, the energy and the feeling of well-being they give you. You probably
eat as much for the pleasure that food brings as you do to satisfy your hunger. Some of the
suggestions may not meet your special needs, but you can adapt them, with the unique and
healthful recipes given.

To experience some simple sprouts, try lentils. Soak 1/3 cup green lentils overnight, preferable
in purified water, in a 1 quart jar. (special sprouting jars with drainage lids can be obtained at
health food stores. You could use nylon or fiberglass mesh as a lid, fitted with an elastic band
or the ring on the canning jar.) In the morning rinse the lentils well with fresh water, then pour
off the water through the lid or mesh. Turn the jar to spread the seeds, then leave the jar upside-
down (tilted at a 45 degree angle ) in a dark, warm place, to continue draining. Rinse and drain
the contents of the jar twice a day, once a day, or sometimes I leave it a day or two and just
rinse, drain and let dry out a little before storing in the fridge. This will depend on the seed or
bean you are sprouting. Beans take longer to sprout, so they need more rinsing. In 2-3 days
the sprouts will be ready to eat. Store sprouts in the refrigerator in a glass jar, sealed plastic
bag or a plastic container. They will keep for about a week.

In Summary

  • Sprouts are one of the most complete foods known to man, with vitamins, proteins, minerals,
    live enzymes, and fiber in their purest form.
  • They are a whole food, nutritious, efficient and the most inexpensive source of dietary fiber
    available.
  • They taste good raw or cooked, have no waste. Higher than meat in protein and the citrus
    fruits in Vit C, at a fraction of the cost!
  • Sprouting makes it easier to digest and adds enzymes that change the starches to sugars
    and proteins to amino acids.
  • Sprouting changes the texture of dried beans and legumes so that they can be easily chewed
    and digested with little or no cooking.
  • Sprouted grains and beans increase in vitamins A,B,C,E and K. Riboflavin and folic acid
    increase up to 13 times the original amount present in the dry seeds. Vit.C increases up
    to 600% in some cases. Two of the most important amino acids necessary for the body
    to manufacture proteins are lysine and tryptophan, which are also increased significantly.
  • They can grow anywhere, needs neither soil nor sunshine, and flourishes in any climate,
    during any season of the year, and ready to harvest in 1-5 days.
  • The volume increases 3-4 times the original amount when sprouted! So, in addition to
    adding important enzymes, increasing nutrition, saving time and effort in preparing whole
    foods, the yield is even a greater savings on your food budget.


HOW TO SPROUT

Jar Method
Soak 1/3 cup seeds in a 1 quart jar of water for 6 hours or overnight. (Special sprouting jars
with drainage lids can be obtained at health food stores. You could use nylon or fiberglass
mesh as a lid, fitted with an elastic band or the ring on the canning jar.)
In the morning rinse
the lentils well with fresh water, then pour off the water through the lid or mesh.
Turn the jar to spread the seeds, then leave the jar upside-down (tilted at a 45 degree angle )
in a dark, warm place, to continue draining. Rinse and drain the contents of the jar once a day,
or sometimes I leave it a day or two and just rinse, drain and let dry out a little before storing
in the fridge. This will depend on the seed or bean you are sprouting. Beans take longer to
sprout, so they need more rinsing. (Sunflower seeds only need 3-6 hrs. soaking and only one
day of sprouting). In 2-3 days the sprouts will be ready to eat. Store sprouts in the refrigerator
in a glass jar, sealed plastic bag or a plastic container. They will keep for over a week. Rinse
and drain occasionally if they are not used up within a week.

Wash Cloth and Plate Method
This is a slower method and to be used if a jar or sprouting trays are not available. Place a wash
cloth or terry cloth on a plate. On top of the cloth, sprinkle unsoaked seeds, touching each other,
on top of the cloth and cover with another cloth Rest the plate on a shallow pan containing water,
with one end of the cloth hanging down into the water. This will act as a wick and draw up the
water to keep the wheat moist and will sprout.


Commercial Sprouting Tray Method
For an easy-to-get started program on sprouting, we recommend a company dedicated to
producing the best possible product in organic, clean pure sprouting seeds, grains and beans
with instructions on how to sprout, and nutritional aspects for the different seeds.
Contact Life Sprouts 1-800-241-1516

Some of the easiest sprouts to grow are: alfalfa, mung bean, chick pea, green or pink
lentil, sesame, sunflower, almond, buckwheat, and wheat.
A lettuce replacement - equal parts of red clover, cabbage, radish and twice the amount
of alfalfa.
A Good Bean Mix - Equal parts of Alaska pea (better tasting than the garden pea),
lentils, mung bean, adjuki bean. Half as much of sunflower, fenugreek seed and triticale
wheat.

Note:
Sprouts are the single most important item left out of our diet for healthy living. A good supply of sprouting seeds could be one of the most important items in your food storage.

These can be eaten alone, in salads, with grains, in sandwiches, gently steamed with veggies, as a snack, or sprinkled over soup. Everyone should store sprouting seeds and use sprouts in their daily diet. This is also the best way to eat soy and the ideal way to eat all legumes. When sprouted, they are much easier to digest and will cook in half the time.

We recommend storing 25 lbs.of seed per person, in addition to wheat. Stored with
Diatomaceous earth (which is a natural insect killer). Grain seeds will last for 8-10 years or more, depending on the moisture content of the grain and atmospheric temperature (must be stored in a cool place for successful sprouting). Vegetable seeds are good for only 5-7 years. It is important; however, to ariate every 2 years, by pouring the stored seeds into another clean bucket and then back again. Seeds are alive and contain oxygen, but if they are canned and never ariated, they can die from their own carbon dioxide and will not sprout. ROTATE, enjoy this live food now and keep it alive for the future. Note: If seeds are canned with an Oxy pack, many will not sprout. Those who are in the know urge canneries to not can or use oxy packs for grains.


RECIPES for List # 1


Sprouted Wheat Crackers
(The method for making sprouted wheat crackers and
cooking in the sun,
comes from the Dead Sea Scrolls)

1 C sprouted wheat (about 1/4 inch long sprout)
1 tsp. salt or other seasoning

With hand food grinder, using the disk that mashes, or grinds the smallest, grind 1 cup
sprouted wheat. When preparing outdoors, you could pound with tamper on hollowed-out
log or rock.

Wheat, when it is sprouted, takes on a slightly sweet flavor; however, they can become
quite strong as they get older. The mashed wheat can be flavored to make a sweet cracker
by adding a little cinnamon, honey, brown sugar, or sweetener of your choice. For a savory
cracker, add onion, garlic or other herb salts. If sesame seeds are available, sprinkle on
rolled out wheat sprout dough before baking.

Spread mashed mixture onto well greased or Pam'd cookie sheet. Roll out to 1/8th inch thick.
You can add sesame seeds, poppy seeds, additional salt etc. At this point. Score into squares,
prick with fork tines a couple of times in each square. Bake in 350° oven for 15-20 minutes or
till browned and crispy. For outdoor cooking, spread out on rock or flat wood surface in the hot
sun about 2-3 hours until crisp and crunchy.
Note: To keep dough from sticking to rolling pin, place freezer paper or brown bag paper on
top of dough, then roll out thin.

Variation by adding flour:
2 cups mashed wheat sprouts
1/2 cup whole wheat, or other grain, flour
1/2 tsp. salt, plus additional seasonings if desired
4 T olive or vegetable oil
2 T water

Mix together. Roll out on a cookie sheet. Bake 20-25 minutes at 350 degrees or till browned
and crisp.

Salads
Add sprouts to a tossed salad or to a blend of grated raw
vegetables (try yams, red beets, turnips, jicama, peeled broccoli spears etc. for a delightful
change) This makes a very nutritious and filling meal.

A Sprout Sweet Treat
Mix two parts wheat sprouts (not older than 2-3 days) to one part coconut. This is good
eaten plain or sprinkled over sliced banana, ice cream, pudding etc.

Other Suggested Uses

* Addition to bread dough (ground fine)

  • A filling for egg omelets
  • Warmed in butter and seasoning
  • Ground with dried fruits such as raisins, dates, figs, apricots, etc., formed into balls
    and rolled in unsweetened coconut. Nuts can be added; also grated orange rind with
    a little juice to hold the balls together.
  List # 2
If You Have List #1 ...plus:

WHOLE GRAINS (wheat, oats, barley, rice etc.)
SALT and /or other SEASONINGS (garlic and onion salt
or powder, and a basic blend (Seasonal, taco, chili pwd. etc.)
OIL (100% virgin olive oil, not light) shortening stores well but is made of harmful chemicals.
HONEY
MILK POWD
ER, non instant

Plus these Tools for Preparing:
Fry pan; sauce pan; cookie sheet; Wire strainer; Hand Grain Mill (that will crack and grind grains
into flour); Stove with oven; honey squeeze bottle.

You Can Make:
1. Cooked Cereal (whole, cracked, rolled - with stove or thermos)
2. Meat Replacement
3. Salads
4. Trail Mix
5. Hot Drink (coffee replacement)
6. Wheat Chips (like potato chips)
7. Powdered Milk Candy
8. Homemade yeast
9. Sour Dough Bread
10. Dutch Oven Bread
11. Unleavened Bread


RECIPES for List #2


1. Cooked Cereal

Using a Thermos Bottle to cook
Warm the thermos first by pouring boiling water into it for about 5 minutes.
Pour
this water out and add equal amounts of boiling water and whole kernel
wheat (or any other grain) to the warmed thermos. Secure lid and leave overnight
or at least for 8-10 hours. The kernels will be large and tender

On Top of Stove (for Cracked Wheat).
Cracked wheat is wheat kernels that have been very coarsely ground.
Sift out any flour found in cracked wheat by shaking it through a fine wire
strainer (these fine particles can be used in other recipes and makes a quick
cream of wheat cereal).
1 C cracked wheat
1 3/4 C water
1 tsp. salt (add after wheat has cooked)

Place water and cracked wheat in heavy sauce pan, bring to full boil, cover, turn
off heat and let stand 15 minutes or till water is absorbed.
Note: This cooked cracked grain makes a flaky, tender breakfast cereal. It can be
used in place of meat, rice dishes and other recipes to replace a ground meat.

On Top of Stove (for Cream of Wheat)

Stir together:
1 C coarse flour (a germade or farina texture)
1 C cool water
In a sauce pan bring to boil:
1 C water

Gradually add the first mixture stirring continuously on a low boil until thick, about
1 minute. Add salt and honey to taste. Serve with milk or juice.

Steamed and dried for Rolled Oats, wheat etc.
Steam the desired grain, for rolling, until tender. Roll thin with a heavy rolling pin.
Dry flakes out in the oven.

2. Meat Replacement
Use cooked crack wheat for a ground meat replacement. (could also use cooked
black or red rice) add to any dish.

3. Salads (using sprouted seeds)
Make a dressing with your seasoning blends and olive oil.

4. Trail Mix (Popped grains and seeds)
In a heavy fry pan (with no oil) over medium-high heat, pop (stirring and/or shaking
constantly) 1 cup each of any or all of the following until lightly browned and popping
sounds have almost stopped: Dry whole wheat kernels (soft wheat is more tender),
raw, green pumpkin seeds (called Oriental or Pepita pumpkin seeds), and raw, hulled
sunflower seeds. Mix together, add ½ teaspoon oil and season with salt, onion or garlic
salt, herb seasonings, or any seasoning of your choice.

5. Hot Drink
Use the popped method, #4 above, for developing parched wheat.
Place ½ cup or less wheat kernels in fry pan on high heat, stirring constantly until the
wheat gets quite dark. Crack in blender or nut mill. Add 1-2 teaspoons parched wheat to
1 cup boiling water. Let steep, strain and serve with milk and honey. Note: for a variety in
your wheat drink, add parched barley and rye to the parched wheat. This makes a blend
similar to postum.
Note: you can add parched wheat to liquids for darkening broths and gravies.

6. Wheat Chips
Similar to potato chips and made from whole wheat
1 C whole wheat flour
2 C water

Mix together and season to taste with one of the following:
1/2 tsp. each onion and garlic salt
1 tsp. salt or vegetable salt substitute
3-4 T parmesan cheese (optional)
1 T of any seasoning The Amazing Wheat book (i.e.,taco, barbecue, onion etc.).

Stir ingredients together. Pour mixture into squirt bottle, as shown in the Quick Wholesome
Foods video,and squirt onto nonstick sprayed cookie sheet in potato chip shapes. Sprinkle
with toasted sesame seeds if desired.
Bake at 350° for 10-15 minutes or until crisp. Check occasionally and turn chips over if middle
is not cooking as fast as the outside.
Note: the thinner the batter, the more crisp the chips.

For cold cereal flakes: season batter only with salt to taste and a little sweetening if desired.
Bake as above for Wheat Chips

7. Powdered Milk Candy
(Honey taffy)
In a heavy sauce pan boil 2 C honey to the hard ball stage, 250° on medium heat, stirring
constantly, (4-5 minutes). Take off heat Add 1 T butter and 1 teaspoon soda (optional). Flavor
with 12 drops oil of anise or your choice of flavor (also optional). Pour onto a buttered surface.
When cool enough to handle, butter hands and start pulling as you do for taffy. When honey
holds its shape and is a golden color, twist into ropes and place back on the counter top or
baking sheet and cut into pieces with scissors. Wrap individually with wax paper.

(Basic candy)
1 ½ cups non instant dry milk
½ cup honey (whipped honey works well in this recipe)
See also "Good For You Treats" in the Additional Recipes Section.

Stir and knead enough dry milk into the honey to make a firm ball. Stretch and
form into pencil size rolls. Let stand 3-4 hours. If rolls flatten out, gather up and
knead more milk into it. Form into rolls and let stand again. Cut into bite-size
pieces. If candy is to be stored, let pieces stand to dry slightly (to prevent sticking)
before piling on top of each other.
Variations:
Add peanut butter, nuts, coconut, dried fruit, carob, flavorings, food coloring,
chocolate or carob chips, or crispy rice cereal. Add flavorings and food coloring to
honey and mix well before adding the dry milk. Try 3 drops oil of peppermint and
¼ teaspoon green food coloring; ½ teaspoon raspberry or strawberry flavoring and
¼ teaspoon red food coloring; ½ teaspoon black walnut flavoring.

8. Homemade Yeast
Mix together 1 C each whole wheat flour, warm water and 2 tsp. honey. Place in bottle,
leave uncovered. Stir several times a day for 5 days in a warm room. There will be small
bubbles
coming to the top and it will have a yeasty aroma.
To keep it going: feed the starter after the 5th day (to replace what you have used) by
adding equal parts flour an water (or potato water). In 24 hours the yeast will be ready
again.
Store unused yeast in fridge with tight lid. Shake it often. To activate it before using
again add 2-3 tablespoons each flour and water and stir.

9. Sourdough Bread
Ingredients:
1 cup yeast (from homemade yeast) 2 tsp. salt
2 cups warm water 2 T dry milk
3 ½ cups flour 1 T honey
Mix well, place ball of soft dough in a nest of flour. Knead in only enough flour to keep
mixture from sticking. Develop the gluten for 10 min. by kneading or pounding. Place the
satin-smooth dough to rise for about 5 hours at room temperature, about 72 degrees or
until it doubles in bulk. (5 hours is the usually time for sour dough to raise.
Shape into 3 oval loaves or use small bread pans about 3 ½ " x 7 ½". Allow to rise again
for about 3 ho
urs. Bake 1 hour at 325 degrees.

10. Dutch Oven Bread
With a hand-crank wheat mill, it takes about 30 minutes to grind enough wheat into flour
for 3 loaves of bread. When cooking and doing dishes without the modern kitchen, you will
want to keep the effort and mess to a minimum. The Dutch oven works well enough to mix
the ingredients, knead the dough, let it rise mix the ingredients with a potato masher.
Depending on the weather, wind and temperature outside you will need about 4-5 coals
underneath for rising the dough. Rising time, about thirty minutes. Let the dough rise only
once, then increase the coals for cooking. For cooking use 8 to 10 briquettes under and 12
to 14 on top. Cooking time is approximately 35 minutes. If the bread is too moist you can
crack the lid for the last 5 to 10 minutes of the cooking time.

Recipe:
4 1/2 cups warm water
1/3 cup oil
2 T salt
3 T yeast- added to 1/2 cup warm water and 1T honey
11-12 cups flour

In a 14 inch dutch oven mix together with a potato masher and work with hands into a
manageable dough. Follow cooking instructions above.
Note: Use vegetable oil on hands to keep dough from sticking

11. Unleavened Bread
(This is also called Matzah -
the Hebrew
name for unleavened bread)

3 cups matzah meal (or a flour the texture of corn meal)
water (enough to make it pliable)
pinch of salt

Knead together until soft and fine. Divide into 3 parts. Roll out thin like a pie crust.
Set on a teflon or lightly oiled (olive or vegetable oil only- to be kosher) cookie sheet
and use a fork to lightly puncture the dough. Bake immediately at 400 until lightly
browned. May be turned over, bake until brown. Don't break. You could bake this in
a loaf pan or in a round ball.

12. Seasonings
Basic Sausage or Mock Beef Seasoning Mix
A versatile, unique blend used for a sausage flavor as well as a substitute
for beef flavor.
3/4 C each salt and sage
1/4 C each: ground rosemary, thyme, marjoram, basil
2 T each: cayenne and garlic powder
2 tsp black pepper
3 T dry minced onion

Combine together and store in labeled container. Makes 2 1/2 cups.
See also the Additional Recipes Section.

 

 List #3

If you have List #1 and #2 ...plus:

  1. LEGUMES, RICE (black or red for meat substitute)
  2. VEGETABLES (fresh, dried or canned)
  3. ONIONS (fresh or dried)
  4. PEANUT BUTTER
  5. EGGS (fresh or powdered)
  6. TOMATOES (canned, sauce, juice etc.)
  7. SODA
  8. BAKING POWDER
  9. YEAST (commercial)
  10. BROTH (vegetable or meat)

Plus these Tools:
Bread pans, oil spray, rolling pin, cookie sheet, sauce pans, bowls, knives.

You Could Make The Following:
1. Chili
2. Spaghetti
3. Meatballs,Veggie Burger
4. Soups
5. Breads
6. Tortillas
7. Dumplings
8. Noodles
9. Crackers
10. Pancakes
11. Peanut Butter Fudge


RECIPES for List #3

1. Chili
4 C steamed wheat or rice
1 onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
2 T cooking oil
2 tsp. chili powder
1/2 tsp. oregano
1 tsp. salt
1 1/2 T whole wheat flour
5 C vegetable, or your choice, broth
1 C tomato sauce

Sauté steamed wheat with onions and garlic until lightly browned. Add
remaining ingredients and simmer to heat , stirring frequently. Serves 6.

2. Spaghetti
2 garlic cloves, minced or garlic powder
1 onion, finely chopped, or dried
2 C tomato sauce (15 oz can)
1 1/2 C tomato paste (12 oz can)
2 T Worcestershire sauce
2 C stewed tomatoes
3 C water
3 tsp. Italian seasoning
1/2 tsp. chili powder mix
1/2 C Romano grated cheese (in a jar or can- optional)
2 T olive oil
2 C cooked ground grains or rice
Mix all ingredients except olive oil, cheese, steamed grain or rice;
cover. Reduce heat; simmer 15-20 min, stirring occasionally. Uncover; add
remaining ingredients and heat through. Place steaming hot in center of
warm plate of hot boiled pasta. Serves 12

Sauce Variation:
1 tsp. Italian seasoning
1/2 tsp. garlic powder or crushed garlic clove
1/2 tsp. chili powder
8 oz can tomato sauce (1 C)
1 #303 can tomatoes (2 C)


3. Basic Meatball or Burger Recipe
2 C steamed cracked or whole grain or rice
3 T finely minced onion or 1 T dry minced onion
1 T seasoning mix
2 T flour
1-2 eggs, beaten
2 T oil (olive best)
salt and pepper to taste

Mix ingredients together and form into balls. Bake at 350° on cookie sheet sprayed
with nonstick cooking spray 20-30 min. or until firm.
4. Veggie burger
Mix ingredients together and form into patty shape. Brown in oiled skillet. If desired, patties may be dipped in egg or breaded first before browning. Serve plain or topped with a gravy or sauce.

Burger made from Cracked Wheat:
2 C cooked cracked wheat
1/2 C chopped onion
2 T dry non-instant milk
2 eggs, beaten

Salt, Pepper,onion and garlic salt or your choice of seasoning.
Mix, season and fry patties.

Filling
Fill each with equal portions of steamed grain or rice, a taco sauce made from
tomato sauce seasoned with onion, garlic, oregano, cayenne, chili powder and
cumin or follow this recipe:

Taco Seasoning Mix:
2 tsp. instant minced onion
1/2 tsp. instant minced garlic
1/4 tsp. dried oregano leaves
1/2 tsp. cornstarch
1/2 tsp. crushed dried red pepper
1 tsp. salt
1 tsp. chili powder
1/2 tsp. ground cumin

Mix together & store in labeled container

4. Soups
Use the recipe below for the seasoning and add whatever vegetables you
have stored, into water.
Noodles could be added.

Basic Vegetable Soup Blend:
This blend is not only great for soups but for flavoring breads also.
1 C each chopped dehydrated carrots, onions, tomatoes and celery including tops.
1/4 C each chopped dehydrated red and green peppers and spinach

Store in container at room temperature. Makes 4 C.

5. Basic Whole Wheat Bread Recipe
This recipe makes 5 loaves. When cut in half, makes 3 loaves.
(8 1/2 x 4 1/2 x 2 1/2)

Mix in bowl till flour is wet:
5 1/2 C hot tap water (140° F)
1/3 C honey
5 C whole wheat flour
1/2-1 C Gluten Flour (optional, used to produce a higher raised bread)
Add and mix for l5 seconds:
3 T Yeast
Add:
2/3 C oil (olive or vegetable )
3 T lemon juice or 50 mg. ascorbic acid (Vit.C)
1 T salt
Add Seasonings for a variety of flavors at this point (see following recipes.)

Knead with an electric bread mixer for 6 minutes or by hand about 10 minutes (300 kneadings)

With oil on your hands remove the dough from bowl and form into loaves. Before placing
loaf size dough into pan, fold and pound with side of fist a few times to get air bubbles out
and to make a tighter and more elastic-like loaf. Tuck into a tight ball-shape and place in
center of greased bread pan. (see instructions for these, and more, bread making tips on
the Quick Wholesome Foods Video-back of book) Place in a warn oven (125 degrees), let
rise to double in bulk. Turn oven up to 350 degrees and bake for about 30 minutes or until
top and bottom crust are brown. Place on wire rack to cool. Store in plastic bags. Freeze,
not refrigerate, to keep from drying out if not using within a few days.

Indian Fry Bread

Mix together:
4 C flour (could use ½ white if available)
½ C non instant powdered milk
2 tsp. baking powder
2 tsp. sweetening
Add:
1 ½ C very hot water (add more if necessary to make dough pliable)

Quickly work ingredients together and knead for a few minutes. Take pieces from ball of
dough, pull and stretch with hands into a circle of about 6-8 inches. (or roll out on oiled
counter and cut into desired shapes). Fry in hot oil. Top with chili or refried beans, and
if you have any of the following: Grated cheese, green onions, lettuce, thawed and slightly
steamed green peas, cooked garbanzo beans, olives etc., with a drizzle of Ranch-type
dressing on top.

6. Tortillas
4 C flour
1 T baking powder
1 tsp. salt
1/3 C oil
1 1/8 C warm water

Mix together and knead gently just to get the dough together. Cover and let rest
5 minutes for gluten to develop. Form into balls (could use a regular size ice cream
scoop). Roll out very thin, at least ¼ inch. Keep remaining dough covered. Bake on
a hot ungreased fry pan or griddle. Brown on both sides. Makes about 24 tortillas.
Note: you may have to add a little more water when using whole wheat. If shortening
is used, cut into dry ingredients. It will be a very soft dough.

7. Dumplings
Blend together:
2/3 C whole wheat flour
1 tsp. baking powder
1/4 tsp. salt
1 T snipped parsley (or 1 1/2 tsp. dry)
1/8 tsp. dry basil, thyme or dill weed (optional)

Mix together and pour into above mixture:
1/4 C milk
2 T oil

Stir with fork until combined and drop with a tablespoon into simmering
soup or stew. Cook 10-12 minutes or till a toothpick comes out clean

8. Homemade Noodles
1 C whole wheat flour
1 large well beaten egg
2 T milk
1/2 tsp. salt

Combine flour, egg, milk and salt to make a stiff ball of dough. On a lightly
floured surface roll dough until very thin, to about 18x20 inches. Let dry about
l-1/2 hours. Cut into 1/2 inch strips with a pizza or pastry cutter. Store in
container that is not airtight. Drop into boiling soup or water. Cook 8 to 10 minutes.
Makes 8 ounces or 3 cups and the cost is about eleven cents.

9. Basic Cracker Recipe
2 C whole wheat flour
1 tsp. salt (or desired seasoning, i.e., Garlic or onion salt etc.)
½ tsp. each baking powder and soda
1/3 C olive or vegetable oil
3/4 C cold water

Cut flour, salt, soda & oil with fork or pastry cutter to a corn meal texture and add
water. Roll out to 1/8 to 1/4 inch thin. Cut with knife or pizza cutter into squares.
Bake at 350° for 10 to 12 minutes
.

10. Basic Pancake Recipe
1 1/4 C whole wheat flour
2 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. salt
1 egg, beaten
1 C milk
2 T oil

Mix together and fry on hot griddle.

Wheat Kernel Pancakes
Blend in liquefier, 4 min:
1 C whole kernel wheat (not cooked)
1 C milk

Add and blend until mixed well:
3 eggs
1/4 C oil
2 tsp. baking powder
1 tsp. soda
1 T honey or sugar
1/4 tsp. salt

Fry on griddle or heavy fry pan

Egg and Dairy Free Pancakes
2 C whole wheat flour
2 T baking powder
1 C soy milk
1 T vinegar
honey and salt to taste

Combine and fry on medium heat.
Note: The pancakes will be tough if batter is saved and used the next day.

Blueberry:
When underside is browned, sprinkle drained blueberries over each pancake. Turn and brown top side.
Apple:
Add to batter 1/2 C finely chopped apple
1/4 tsp. cinnamon

Waffles
2 eggs (separated-optional)
1-1/4 milk (when using buttermilk, mix with 1/2 tsp. soda)
1/4 C oil
1/2 tsp. salt
3 tsp. baking powder
1 3/4 C whole wheat flour (could mix half white)

Mix all moist ingredients with electric beaters. Add dry ingredients. Stir well but don't over mix. Bake in preheated waffle iron. For a light and crisp texture,separate the eggs and beat. Fold in stiff whites just before baking.

11. Peanut Butter Fudge
2 C peanut butter - plain or crunchy
2 C honey
2 C powdered dry milk (non-instant)

Heat honey and peanut butter in heavy saucepan over low heat to a very soft,
creamy texture, stir constantly or it will burn. Pour into bowl of the powdered milk
and stir till thoroughly mixed, kneading with hands until pliable. (At this point,
if you have any of the following, you may add: dried chopped fruit, nuts, seeds,
coconut, carob or chocolate chips, rice crispies etc.)
Roll into balls or pat down in cookie sheets, baking pans, or anything flat with sides.
Score
into squares with warmed knife. Put in fridge or freezer till cool and slightly
firm. To keep firm, store in cool place.
Note: For a more firm texture add 1/4-1/2 C more dry powdered milk.

Variations:
* Press an almond in each cut square, a large chocolate chip, dried fruit bits etc.
before putting in the refrigerator.
* Roll small balls in toasted coconut or chopped nuts
* Chopped dried fruit and seeds may be added
* Add carob powder to the basic mixture or baking cocoa
* 2 C puffed rice cereal mixed in basic recipe is very good.

 Additional Recipes - from "The Amazing Wheat Book" by LeArta Moulton

Basic Guide for Seasoning with Herbs
Basic Bran Muffin
Bar-B-Q Sauce
Bulgar Wheat
Buttermilk Dressing
Coconut Crisps
Cucumber Dressing
Filled Cookies
Good For You Treats
Graham Crackers
Green Pepper Bake
Healthy Replacement
Herb Seasoning Salt
Herb Seasoning for Salads
Honey Taffy
Indian Fry Bread
Instead of Salt
Italian Dressing Mix
Mayonnaise

Milk from Grains and Seeds
Onion Soup Mix
Oriental Seasoning Mix
Peanut Butter Almond Cookies
Perfect Sourdough Bread
Quick Rolls
Ranch Dressing & Mix
Sloppy Joe Seasoning Mix
Sprouted Wheat Crackers
Vegetarian Seasoning Mix
Wheat Chips
Wheat Grass
Wheat Meat with Gluten
Whole Wheat Biscuits
Whole Wheat Pie Crust
Wild Herbs for Seasoning
Yam Pie

 Storing Water

Water is more essential than food in sustaining life, and over the long term needs to be constantly available from an unpolluted source. But realistically, in case of severe emergency, plan to have enough water to sustain your family for TWO WEEKS.

How Much to Store:
Water storage should take top priority in emergency preparedness. 1 gallon per day per person is the recommended minimum. 1/2 gallon (2 quarts) for daily drinking and ½ gallon for daily washing. Try going without the water from your faucets one day and see how you fare with your emergency water supply. You may decide, like we did, to dejunk more storage areas and make room for more water!
Store a minimum of 7 gallons of water per person for drinking and food preparation. Store an additional seven gallons per person of the same quality water for bathing, brushing teeth, and dishwashing. This is approximately 3 gallons per person for 72 hours, or 14 gallons for 2 weeks.

How to Store:
Water can be stored in any durable non-glass container designed to store liquids for extended periods. If you use plastic, plan on changing the water every few months, as there is some transfer of toxic materials from some plastics to the water. Empty plastic milk jugs are food-grade, but they may start leaking over a period of time. Empty and cleaned 2-liter pop bottles hold up just fine with indoor storage where the temperature is more constant; however, a 2-liter bottle that has been in the car-trunk during the heat of the summer and extreme cold of winter will eventually start to crack. Put a new 2-liter bottle of water in your car trunk at the change of extreme hot and extreme cold weather.

In summary, use heavy plastic containers with tight fitting lids. Metal containers, which may corrode, tend to give water an unpleasant taste. If possible, use non-breakable containers for your water storage. You could end up without a water supply if all your glass containers are shattered.

Water Treatment:
8 drops of chlorine bleach per gallon of water can be added If the tap water you are storing is not already chlorinated from the public water supply. If the tap water you use is already chlorinated, just put that water directly into you clean, food-grad container with out adding extra chlorine bleach. USU research indicates that the water should last for at least 10 years. However, if you store the water in a glass container that has a cardboard liner in the lid, the cardboard will disintegrate and create off flavors and off odors. So, if you have such a water-storage container, take the cardboard liner out before you store water.

If you have any doubt as to the bacterial safety of stored water, you may purify it by boiling vigorously for 1-2 minutes, or as mentioned, by adding chlorine bleach. Generally, ½ a teaspoon of bleach will purify 5 gallons of clear water, and 1 teaspoon will purify 5 gallons of cloudy water. If you store it away from sunlight in clean containers, and if it is safe bacterially at the time of storage, water will remain pure indefinitely.

To be safe for culinary use, water must be rendered chemically and biologically harmless. The right water purifier would remove harmful bacteria, protozoa, amoebae, viruses, fibers, sediment (microscopic particles of dirt, rust, scale, radioactive particles etc.), organics, and other agents such as chlorine and radioactive gasses. The best type use ceramic cartridges, sup glass and/or carbon for filtering with silver, iodine or chlorine to kill bacteria. Some are more effective than others. Systems using iodine probable give the most complete bacteriological protection. Even those using essentially only mechanical filters with a small pore size are very effective. In the event of nuclear war, when fallout is a problem, the dissolved and undissolved radiation particles should be removed from the water to the greatest extent possible before other purification measures are taken. Activated carbon contained in many of the purification devices will remove moist of these contaminates. Contact Alan South for the ideal water-purifiers 1-877-767-4382

Note:
If a disaster disrupts the electricity needed to pump the water to your home, there should be a sufficient amount for drinking and food preparation stored within the pipes in the house to last for a short period , if used sparingly. Water can be drawn from the lowest faucet in the house (usually the water heater or water tank) if the highest facet is opened a bit to let air into the pipes.

Remember that canned fruit and fruit juices also have a high content, and their liquid can count as part of your water supply. Individual cartons of fruit or fruit juice are great for a 72-hour kit.

A carrying strap that is attached to the top of your own 1-liter or 2-liter of water can also be useful. If you don't have one from an emergency preparedness store, a heavy string or strip of fabric could easily be substituted.

Other Sources of Water:
Lakes, ponds, ditches, and streams all have water, but it should be rendered safe before being used. Springs, seeps, appropriately-located cisterns, and wells can also be good sources of water. Even a small solar still could provide some drinking water until other sources could be developed. See Sense of Survival for diagrams and instructions on making water filters, a well, improvised well pump and finding water in the desert.

 "Preparing for the Future" Recorded March 2000- Part 1
KSRR 1440 AM with host Donna Max

Radio interview with: LeArta Moulton, MH. and
colleague Sandy Ellis, MH.
  • Preparing, Using & Storing Herbs
  • Herbs for emergency situations
  • Additional Products
  • Be your own doctor
  • Comfrey (BF&C) for healing
  • Saving money with herbs
 "Preparing for the Future" Recorded March 2000 - Part 2

Various Herbs for healing:
Onions, Mullein, Yarrow, Kid-e-well.

  • Common Colds & Fevers
  • Burns
  • Using & Storing Herbs
  • Herbs for emergencies
Copyright © 2007 LM Publications
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